Book Review – Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

29844228
You can’t stop the future. You can’t rewind the past. The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play.
Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker – his classmate and crush – who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why. Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever.

Genre: Young Adult

Rating: 4 stars

Review:

I finally read Jay Asher’s Thirteen Reasons Why and just in time for the new Netflix tv show based on the book.

It’s such a heartbreaking story, about a young girl who had her whole life ahead of her and she threw it away.

I’ve seen that some readers have left low reviews saying that Hannah let small things get her down, that she died for nothing.

But they weren’t small things. Hannah’s suicide – it was such a waste. But that’s how depression works. Insidious. How it creeps up on you and you don’t notice until it’s too late. How your life feels hopeless. If you’re not strong enough, can’t will yourself out of it, it can drown you. And when you’re drowning, you’re unable to call for help, unable to accept it when it’s given.

She got to a point where she lost any self-respect for herself. She didn’t have the willpower or the courage to do the right thing. That, more than anything, drowned her.

Why is it so hard to do the right thing? For people to be considerate? This book didn’t just portray Hannah’s decisions but the other kids involved in her life who were selfish and who used others to benefit themselves. How many of us can say we would have done the right thing in her shoes? It’s easy to say it, but harder to live it when you see the injustice and cruelty happening around you. Do we really know what a person is truly going through?

The one I felt the most for, was Clay. It’s the people left behind who are the ones who hurt the worst.

Jay Asher wrote a story which emphasized real issues that are happening in our high schools, issues like bullying, peer pressure, sexual abuse, stalking, rape. High school should be a safe place and instead, it’s a minefield. How many kids end up drowning under those problems? How many are like Hannah? Who don’t have anyone to talk to, someone who listens to them? Who are misunderstood? Who feel invisible or who are crushed down by other people?

Thirteen Reasons Why was a well-written story. Maybe it can sensitize others into thinking of the consequences of their actions and give them the courage to do the right thing.

S.R. McKade

Review – The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower #1) by Stephen King

Book I In The Gunslinger (originally published in 1982), King introduces his most enigmatic hero, Roland Deschain of Gilead, the Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting, solitary figure at first, on a mysterious quest through a desolate world that eerily mirrors our own. Pursuing the man in black, an evil being who can bring the dead back to life, Roland is a good man who seems to leave nothing but death in his wake. This new edition of The Gunslinger has been revised and expanded throughout by King, with new story material, in addition to a new introduction and foreword. It also includes four full-color illustrations in the hardcover and trade paperback formats.
Synopsis:    Book I
In The Gunslinger (originally published in 1982), King introduces his most enigmatic hero, Roland Deschain of Gilead, the Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting, solitary figure at first, on a mysterious quest through a desolate world that eerily mirrors our own. Pursuing the man in black, an evil being who can bring the dead back to life, Roland is a good man who seems to leave nothing but death in his wake.
This new edition of The Gunslinger has been revised and expanded throughout by King, with new story material, in addition to a new introduction and foreword. It also includes four full-color illustrations in the hardcover and trade paperback formats.

Genre: Horror, Thriller

Review: 4 of 5 Stars

When I first started on the Dark Tower series some ten years ago, I had to stop at book 3 or 4 because back then, book 5 to 7 weren’t available where I lived and it was so hard to find the books I was looking for. Having an E-reader changed my life for the best – I could finally find the books I wanted – no, needed. I can’t count the number of books I’ve read since I got my Kindle. Here’s to hoping I finally make it to book 7 of the Dark Tower series.

Review
Every time I think of the Gunslinger, the image of Clint Eastwood from one of my favorite movies “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” pops into my mind. Oh, how I had my heart set on the rugged and dashing cowboy!

So that’s how Roland of Gilead, the gunslinger, looks like to me. He and Jake are the two characters who totally stole my heart from the very first moment I ‘met’ them. I can’t help but empathize with both of them.

Stephen King tells a gripping, mysterious tale of a gunslinger who relentlessly pursues a man in black in a quest to find The Dark Tower. We don’t know what The Dark Tower is or why Roland is seeking it. I found the man in black totally bonkers and absolutely spooky. *shudder* (Way to go, Mr. King.)

The first book’s like an appetizer, just giving you a tantalizing taste of all the delicacies to come. I was a willing follower of the Gunslinger throughout his journey and the tough choices he faced.

The only reason I gave this book 4 stars instead of 5, was because Roland’s biggest choice made me unhappy but I understood why he had to do it.

Stephen King’s always been an amazing story-teller, but his Dark Tower series? They’re an absolute MUST-READ!

 

 

Review – Stiltskin by Andrew Buckley

2

4 Stars

“Dunno, screamed un shouted but ah dint tek no notice fer a while. Screamin ain’t not usual ere. Aftur a week sorta figured he wuz serias.”
“Ome sweat ome,” drooled the Troll.”

LOL. Absolutely chuckle-worthy and one of the most original plot-lines I’ve ever read. Andrew Buckley did a marvelous job creating suspense so engrossing the story kept me hooked until the last page. Very clever portraying of the characters and the world depicted in it. I loved all the characters – there was just something about each of them I liked. Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum. The Mad Hatter sounded almost sane in his insanity. Very well-written.